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History:
The McKenna Story: Emyvale is over 3000 years old - a Bronze Age tomb was discovered here in 1959. Unfortunately, the urn and other artefacts found were inadvertently destroyed. The first known inhabitants of Emyvale were of the Ui Meith tribe, hence the name of Emy. However in the 8th century the McKenna Clan arrived and by the 12th century they had established an independent little ‘tuath’ or kingdom in North Monaghan, which would last for the next 500 years. Legend tells us that McKenna came from Meath on a hunting expedition as he followed a stag for two days and two nights and eventually killed the prey at Liskenna in the Barony of Truagh. He fell in love with the daughter of Treanor and settled here. The McKenna Logo, which is also the McKenna Coat of Arms, shows the Hunter on horseback; his two faithful Hounds; a Stag; Two crescent moons - indicating the two days and nights that McKenna pursued the huge deer. The McKenna Headquarters was at Tully Fort and Crannog, 1Km east of Emyvale, on the road to Glaslough, and these fortifications remained in position until they were completely destroyed in three successive English invasions - in 1602 (following the defeat at Kinsale), in 1642 and in 1643. Their final defeat came at the Battle of Drumbanagher (near Glaslough) in March 1688. The McKenna Cross stands in the Old Donagh Graveyard, 3.5Km from Emyvale and 1Km from Glaslough. It dates from the 12th century and is almost 7ft. In height. According to local tradition it was in the shadow of this Cross that the McKenna chieftains were inaugurated as Leaders of their Clann. It was obviously deliberately knocked down by ‘the Planters’ of the early 17th century and lay buried in the ground until discovered by a member of the Leslie family c.1830. It was knocked or blown down again at a later date and again lay buried until 1910, when it was re-discovered by Sir Shane Leslie, who had it erected in its present location. The stem appears short but actually stands 6ft. 2ins. In height. A concrete collar of 18ins. Surrounds the lower part of the stem, keeping the two broken parts together. In the 13th century the McKennas had become very strong and controlled vast tracts of land in North Monaghan. They ousted McMahon and yet they helped each other when attacked. During the following 400 years or so they were very powerful and fought many battles, helping O’Neill and Maguire, who returned the favour when needed. They had HQ in many places around Emyvale and their main concentration was on Tully Hill where the remains of their fort can be seen. They also had forts on surrounding Hills as well. In 1604 and again in 1641 and 1643 Tully was attacked and destroyed. McKenna moved to Minmurray lake. In 1688 McKenna led the Jacobite support to Drumbanagher where Anketal attacked them and won the Battle. Anketal was killed in the final attack but Major John McKenna was captured and executed. It is said that prior to going into the war McKenna tossed his huge fortune into Minmuray Lake and it has never been found.
PEI Connection .. HERE     Carleton Connection .. HERE
The McKenna Story: Emyvale is over 3000 years old - a Bronze Age tomb was discovered here in 1959. Unfortunately, the urn and other artefacts found were inadvertently destroyed. The first known inhabitants of Emyvale were of the Ui Meith tribe, hence the name of Emy. However in the 8th century the McKenna Clan arrived and by the 12th century they had established an independent little ‘tuath’ or kingdom in North Monaghan, which would last for the next 500 years. Legend tells us that McKenna came from Meath on a hunting expedition as he followed a stag for two days and two nights and eventually killed the prey at Liskenna in the Barony of Truagh. He fell in love with the daughter of Treanor and settled here. The McKenna Logo, which is also the McKenna Coat of Arms, shows the Hunter on horseback; his two faithful Hounds; a Stag; Two crescent moons - indicating the two days and nights that McKenna pursued the huge deer. The McKenna Headquarters was at Tully Fort and Crannog, 1Km east of Emyvale, on the road to Glaslough, and these fortifications remained in position until they were completely destroyed in three successive English invasions - in 1602 (following the defeat at Kinsale), in 1642 and in 1643. Their final defeat came at the Battle of Drumbanagher (near Glaslough) in March 1688. The McKenna Cross stands in the Old Donagh Graveyard, 3.5Km from Emyvale and 1Km from Glaslough. It dates from the 12th century and is almost 7ft. In height. According to local tradition it was in the shadow of this Cross that the McKenna chieftains were inaugurated as Leaders of their Clann. It was obviously deliberately knocked down by ‘the Planters’ of the early 17th century and lay buried in the ground until discovered by a member of the Leslie family c.1830. It was knocked or blown down again at a later date and again lay buried until 1910, when it was re-discovered by Sir Shane Leslie, who had it erected in its present location. The stem appears short but actually stands 6ft. 2ins. In height. A concrete collar of 18ins. Surrounds the lower part of the stem, keeping the two broken parts together. In the 13th century the McKennas had become very strong and controlled vast tracts of land in North Monaghan. They ousted McMahon and yet they helped each other when attacked. During the following 400 years or so they were very powerful and fought many battles, helping O’Neill and Maguire, who returned the favour when needed. They had HQ in many places around Emyvale and their main concentration was on Tully Hill where the remains of their fort can be seen. They also had forts on surrounding Hills as well. In 1604 and again in 1641 and 1643 Tully was attacked and destroyed. McKenna moved to Minmurray lake. In 1688 McKenna led the Jacobite support to Drumbanagher where Anketal attacked them and won the Battle. Anketal was killed in the final attack but Major John McKenna was captured and executed. It is said that prior to going into the war McKenna tossed his huge fortune into Minmuray Lake and it has never been found.
History:
PEI Connection ……  HERE William Carleton Connection HERE
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