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Local History

WHAT'S IN YOUR NAME:? Hilary Murphy replies to more inquiries from readers regarding their family names.
Good to see the surname "McKenna" and North Monaghan featured in a recent edition of "Ireland's Own" weekly magazine. This McKenna name has already been well recorded by local Historian Seamus McCluskey and also by the late Peadar Livingstone in "The Monaghan Story". The text by Hilary Murphy reads as follows:
"The McKennas have been associated with the barony of Truagh for many centuries. The name is so predominant in North Monaghan that local names are used to distinguish different McKenna families. and many of these in turn are inter-related. Their ancestors were introduced as swordsmen by the Fir Leamhna of Clogher whose early medieval Kingdom included the barony of Truagh. It is here that the McKennas had their Kingdom in the Middle Ages. Their forbears were a branch of the Cenel Fiachach tribe of Meath. The last McKenna chieftain was Patrick who was granted two-thirds of Truagh in the land settlement of 1591. He was friendly to the English at the beginning of the Nine Years War but after the battle of Clontibret in 1595 he joined Hugh O'Neill and the other Irish Chieftains.Patrick survived the war and was regranted most of his lands in the 1606 settlement. He died about 1616 at Tully Lough near Emyvale. Before he died he had divided his estates among his family. John McKenna, a grandson of Patrick, became High Sheriff of Monaghan under James11. He was executed by the Williamites after the battle of Drumbanagher in 1689."
Source: The Monaghan Story by Peadar Livingstone. (Submitted by Nancy)

Funeral of Sir John Leslie: On the 23rd January, 1916, the death took place of Sir John Leslie of Glaslough at his London residence. He was born 1822. He served as Conservative MP for Co.Monaghan from 1871 to 1880, his loss of the seat that year reflective of the great political and social changes that were underway in Ireland. He was a most respected Landlord - in his obituary in the Nationalist Dundalk Democrat, he was described as "one of the best Landlords in Ireland" but he was also a vociferous opponent of Home Rule. Sir John was well known in literary circles. He was an accomplished artist in his own right; some of his paintings were exhibited at the Royal Academy and his "Peter denying Christ" was exhibited in the Belfast Municipal Art Gallery' Family lore has it that he built Glaslough House (now Castle Leslie) in the early 1870s both to mark his elevation to the peerage and also to house his many paintings. He also gave generously towards the building of the Episcopal Church in Glaslough, which at the time of his death, was described as "one of the most beautiful ecclesiastical edifices in the country". He was survived by his four daughters and one son, Colonel John, who was married to Leonie Jerome, aunt of Winston Churchill. His coffin, covered in the Union Jack, was carried by a horse drawn carriage from the station at Glaslough to his final resting place in the family church on the demesne.
(submitted by Nancy McCluskey, Emyvale) (Permission kindly given by Noel Breakey, Monaghan County Museum)

Thanks to Glenn  for sourcing this photo of the funeral going from the railway station in Glaslough to the Church prior to burial.

Monaghan Town: Monaghan Town is the seat of the Catholic diocese of Clogher which includes County Monaghan, nearly all of Fermanagh, and parts of Donegal,Louth and Tyrone. Rackwallace was the ancient name of Monaghan Parish. The old stock of Monaghan always saw to it that their children were baptised into one or other of the Christian Churches and this is why the surest way of tracing an ancestor is through the Parish register.
A thousand years ago Monaghan was distinguished only by a monastery. In the Annals of The Four Masters, this monastery was plundered in 830 and again in 931. MONAGHAN which means "The town of the Monks" or "Hilly Place" was also known as McMahon country due to the McMahon clan control in the area. The County was also part of The Kingdom of Oriel, which was the old gaelic name for the area. The McKennas, Connollys and McMahons continued to control this area even during the Norman invasion, but Hugh de Lacy later invaded Monaghan and burned the town and abbey but soon after erected a Castle there and restored the Monastic institution.
From Monaghan Town Family Roots; Exploring Family Origins in Monaghan Town by Noel Farrell,Longford. Booklet available in all good book stores. Permission granted, Submitted by Nancy McCluskey

Shaws Corner: I was very pleased indeed at the report of crash by milk lorry on Sunday llth January last. The report referred to the scene as Shaws Corner, Main St., Emyvale. However, this did give rise to many questions from the younger generation, "Where is Shaws Corner"? It is good that the old placenames are still being used.
The Shaws had a particularly long association with Main St., Emyvale, on the Northern end of the village. There was Alex, a small farmer and John, a postman (or letter carrier) as referred to in records. They were two very popular Presbyterians (or Church of Ireland) gentlemen. John would come along delivering his post, singing a very whimsical and lively song. His co-workers were John Hughes and Hugh Henry Wilkinson, both residents of Emyvale village. John lived in a cottage where Dermot McMahon’s shop now stands but moved to Oriel park when it opened. Hugh Henry lived in the house to the right of the McKenna’s Maxol Station.
In the census records 1901, village of Emyvale, taken from book, by well known historian and Editor Seamus McCluskey, "Emyvale McKenna Country", it lists the inhabitants as Alex Shaw, with number of residents in each family as 3. There may have been a Henry Shaw. In fact, early records show that this name dates back to the 1800s. We do not know where the Shaw family originated from; probably came to Emyvale in the early centuries with English or Scottish settlers. Their little thatched whitewashed cottage, just past the residence of the late Ned Hughes, (Post Office side of Main St., Emyvale) was demolished years ago by the local authorities. The Shaws are buried in the Graveyard at Glennan Church.

McCluskeys of Emy: Probably the oldest family with an Emy Lough connection is the McCluskey family. These McCluskeys came as a part of O'Neills Army to the Battle of Clontibret in 1595. One of the, Shane (John) did not return home. He married a McKenna and settled on a farm on the shores of Emy Lough. The rent rolls of the Leslie estate show that these McCluskeys held a farm on the Lough shore from 1605 right down to modern times. Shane's direct descendant. William McCluskey, purchased another small farm further along the shore at the most northerly corner of the Lough. His daughter Catherine married John Joe Savage from nearby Tully townland. They had twin boys named Pat and Willie who mstill reside in the old homestead of the McCluskeys.
Pat and Willie's uncle Patrick McCluskey, a veteran of the War of Independence, had charge of the regulating the sluice gate at the lake from 1924, when Mullan Boot Factory first opened, until his death in 1972. His task was to open the sluice gate every morning at 6.30am, a duty he performed diligently and punctually. On Patrick;s death this important duty was taken over by his nephew, Pat Savage, who has acted as watch-dog on water levels since then. The brothers have a deep interest in the lake, over which they constantly maintain a fatherly eye, and they are always willing to give a bit of the history of the lake to the many visitors who come here. They were also recently accorded quite an amount of fame when they figured prominently in an RTE television documentary film which received wide acclaim troughout Ireland. To-day they witness a further step forward in the history of the lake they love so much. Taken from booklet Official Opening of Emy Lough Pilot Treatment Plant (GlasloughTyholland Group Water Scheme) by Noel Dempsey,TD,, Minister for Environment and Local Government on Monday 14th February, 2000. (submitted by Nancy McCluskey)

Showbands: Good to see our former Showband legends Frank Murphy, Oriel Park, Emyvale and Colm McQuaid, Derrygasson, Emyvale, featured in The Christmas edition of Ireland's Own with The Pat Campbell, Tydavnet Showband in the 60s Frank played lead guitar and Colm Bass guitar.
Pat Campbell of Tydavnet,Co.Monaghan, established his Showband in the l950s and held early concerts in Co.Cavan and at the Swan Park Ballroom in Monaghan town. By the early 1960s the band was playing in Dublin and across Ireland and soon went on to perform at high-profile British venues such as the Galtymore Ballroom in London.
One of the band;s most memorable accolades came in 1961, when Campbell and the band members were presented with an award for attracting the largest Irish concert audience of the year at a performance in the Beechmount Ballroom, Navan, Co.Meath. Camobell was aided in the band's promotion by friend and future Taoiseach Albert Reynolds.
Campbell's great enthusiasm for jazz music led to the recruitment of Gene Bannon, Saxophonist. Following the disbandment of the group in 1966, Bannon joined The Times Showband. Some of the band members continued as Dawn Knight and The Casuals. Campbell went on to write and publish his own music and poetry. In the late 1980s his reputation as a poet was acknowledged when he was invited to serve as a visiting lecturer at Oxford University.
Taken from Ireland's Own weekly magazine December 19, 2014.

Emy Lake:
Pat Owen McMahon was born in Emy and lives with his wife Dympna and son :eo in a bungalow overlooking Emy Lough. His father had a boat as far back as Pat Owen can remember and he tells of his first trip in a boat using two shovels for oars when he and other members of his family decided to go out on the lake themselves. Some of the neighbours who saw the children on their own on the lake in their father's boat told their father what they saw. His father when told about the boat got a saw and cut the boat in two parts. Pat Owen told me that one day many years ago a man from the area called Joe McKenna but was known as Joe "Noggin" asked to be taken out to the "crannog" (which was an island) and to bring a spade with him. When they arrived Pat Owen was told to dig a hole at the spot pointed out by Joe and all tha could be found was a dark type of crumbly clay. Joe was not satisfied at what hesaw and told Pat Owen to dig in another place with the same result. On inquiring what type of soil this was was told"that's not soil but Bones" and Pat Owen inquired who was buried here to be told they were animal bones"!! Legend has it that soldiers who know the "Pad" to the "crannog" used to go there and cook their meals from animals. Following an unsuccessful attempt by the Inland Fisheries to clear all the pike from the lake using nets they sprayed the water with a chemical, that removed the oxygen from the water and all the fish came to the top dead. Then the lake was restocked with fingering trout and now the lake is well populated with trout. Many good trout were bagged on Emy Lake and the first large one Pat Owen remembers was caught by a man named Wilson from Belfast which weighed 5 and a quarter lbs. The largest trout caught to date he believes was hooked by Adrian McKenna, Pillar House, Glaslough on the 22-6-97 using a "claret bumble" and weighed 7lbs. This large trout can be seen in the bar in the Pillar House, Glaslough.
The lake which is now owned by the Central Fisheries Board is fished by fishermen all over Ireland and from the UK; France, Germany and the USA. If you want to fish now you must have a permit which Pat Owen can supply and also a boat if you require it.
A boat building class was held in the Old Vocational School in Emyvale and were built there under the supervision of Pat Hare. There was a launching ceremony after the boats were blessed by the late Fr. Barney McCarney,CC and this was performed by the late Erskine Childers who was later elected President of Ireland.
Pat Owen's wish is that fishermen enjoy good fishing and that he, his wife Dympna "who never" misses the Punchline and Leo are spared to have good quality water on tap.
(Peter Sherry from booklet Official Opening of Emy Lough Pilot Treatment Plant By Noel Dempsey, T.D., Minister for Environment and Local Government, Monday 14th February, 2000; Glasloughtyholland group water scheme)
submitted by Nancy McCluskey

Gallant rescue: Great credit is due to all concerned in a rescue operation in Glaslough Lake last Friday, when a young man was in difficulties in deep water for three quarters of an hour. Bridie Comiskey heard the cries of his companions for help and quickly summoned priest, Gardai, life savers and Doctor. Hero of the rescue was Jack Heaney who managed to get a disused boat to the spot and brought the young man safely aboard. (From Donagh Parish Bulletin June 24th, 1973.)

The Weather: The older generation, sailors, farmers were very much into weather lore; They observed animal behaviour, wildlife, the cloud patterns; flowers before storm; even the smoke from chimney fires. If the smoke ascended weather would be fine but if going down, rain was on the way; the rooks and swallows would fly lower; flowers such as tulips. daisies and dandelions would close their eyes; geese would cackle; the donkey brayed; and indeed the bones; teeth and bunions ached in humans when rain was coming. Instead of watching tv and listening for weather forecasts on radio, many people still observe weather lore.
The birds: "The north wind shall blow and we will have snow, and what will poor robin do then, poor thing" Yes, it is past this time of year again for a gentle reminder to feed our feathered friends, the birds. If feeding with bread, make sure to moisten it leaving it easier for birds to swallow; scraps of suet or fat is important for energy.
According to wildlife expert, exGarda Joe Shannon. nuts and seeds are most important for protein and helps birds to survive during the cold winter months. If you have a cat, keep an eye on her; probably the birds' greatest threat and enemy. The birds will reward you with their song and twitter in the Spring.

Dancing Deck: In the period 1928 to 1930, in an era when commercial dance halls, or indeed halls of any kind, were unknown and most travelling was done on foot - dancing was the social pastime. The dances were held at cross-roads or on a green grassy patch when the weather was kind. As time went on, having a dancing deck in the locality was a "big thing" in those days.
The musicians for the dances at the "dancing deck" were Sarah Murray, Corraclare, Emyvale,(mother of Minnie McKenna,Emy) on melodeon; "Baby" Corrigan, Emy, on accordion, Malachy Corrigan, Emy and Pat McQuaid (Roe), Killycooley, both on fiddle. The dances were held each Sunday afternoon from 3pm to 5pm or 6pm, but definitely finished before "milking time". The location was beside the sluice in Emy (Emy Lough), near Patrick and Brigid's McCluskeys house. People came in very large numbers from Emyvale, Glaslough, Mullanmills, and further afield. If there had been a wedding in that area during that week, the bride and groom also made an appearance and this would be a very special occasion for the happy couple.
It is not certain who built the deck, but the work was probably carried out by a "boon" of men from the neighbourhood. It was a concrete structure, so therefore, waltzes were not so popular. Many a man went home with scarcely a sole on his shoes from all the dancing on the cement floor. No refreshments were served - just plenty of good fresh air, lively dancing and good fun.
Popular dances at the times were all the ceilidhe dances, waltzes, flings. The Stack of Barley, The Berlin Polka, Mazurka (a Polish dance which Granny Minnie was brilliant at as it is a bit complicated); Exhibitions of The Pot Stick Dance; The ClapDance, The Lancers; the Charleston; The Jenny Lynn Polka, The Military Two-step. Usually the musicians would call out the next dance and if the dancers were slow to take the floor, the music would stop, and they were ordered to get out and dance This rarely happened,however. "The Pot Stick" dance:The dancer waved a stick in time to the music during the first strain of the tune; then passed the stick under his legs and arms and around his body while keeping time to the music. At the house parties in later years, on great performer of this particular dance was Bob Stewart, Corragh and formerly of Emy, Emyvale Some of these dancing decks were frowned up by the clergmen of the period and were often condemned from the pulpit in Church on a Sunday.
Memories by the late Minnie McKenna, Emy as related to her grand-child, Mary McCluskey of Corracrin NS,Emyvale, in a project for "Heritage Year" 1990 Minnie died in 1993, aged 85 years.
Above "The Dancing Deck" at Emy Lough was also published in Clann McKenna Book, 2006: Editor Seamus McCluskey

St. Patrick’s Corracrin: In the 19th century, with the easing of the Penal Laws, an ambitious programme of Church building was undertaken in parishes throughout the Diocese of Clogher, and indeed throughout the whole Island of Ireland. Fr.Daniel McMullin, Parish Priest of Donagh at the time, acquired the site for St.Patrick's, Corracrin, from the Leslie Estate. The Church, which bears the name of Fr.McMullin on its foundation stone, was built in 1811. The east wall faced the main road, of the time, evidence which still can be seen at the rear entrance to the cemetery. Access to the Church was via two doors on the east wall, one entrance for women and the other for men. In the 1820s, a new stretch of road from Coolshannagh to the Two Trees at Creevelea was constructed. Some time later work began on remodelling St.Patrick's in view of the road realignment. The two existing doors were closed up and a new doorway and bell tower built on the northern gable. Access to the Church grounds from then on was via the new N2 road. On Sunday 13th November 1898, the Church was finally dedicated by Most Rev.Dr.Owens, Bishop of Clogher. This ceremony could only take place when the building was debt free. The following is from an article which appeared in the Peoples Advocate, published on the 19th November 1898. "A sum of £2,000 was expended by the good Parish Priest, the Rev.Felix McKenna, and the total amount received by that gentleman after the collection was taken up was £2,115. This generosity affords matter for thanks and congratulations -thanks to the loyal Irish Catholics who defrayed the debt, and congratulations to the energetic Parish Priest in attaining the end for which he so zealously worked".
Notes by Mary Lavery in booklet Celebrating 200 years St.Patrick's Church, Corracrin; Sunday 23rd October,2011. World Mission Sunday.

Emyvale ICA: Emyvale ICA Guild was founded in 1959, on the suggestion of a local priest, Fr.PE Larkin and the first meeting was held in the then Parochial Hall in Emyvale village in February of that year. The Officers elected were: Anna Corrigan (President); Maureen Hackett (vice President); Susan McKenna (Emy) (Secretary), and Joyce Eakin (Treasurer). By the second meeting, a week later, there were over forty new members. ICA Organiser; Teresa King, also attended those early meetings and the "infant" Guild also received tremendous assistance from Mrs. Patterson, Ballybay, the then Federation President. One of the earlist projects to be undertaken was the planting of over 100 sitka spruce trees at the rear of the Parochial Hall (now an Oratory). Weekly classes, meetings and demonstrations of all kinds, from rug making to the icing of Christmas cakes, soon featured on the varied and interesting Guild programme. It was not all work, however, as many social activities and regular outings were also part of the yearly activities. Members from neighbouring Truagh Guild joined us on our outings to the Ulster History and Folk Park and Ellas Barn in Caledon. An interesting demonstration on doll making was given in June 1985 by Mrs. Pamela Millar, President of Cavan Federation and neighbouring Guilds from Ballinode and Scotstown attended. The selection of dolls on show was very impressive and everyone enjoyed the night immensely. Being so close to the border, it was a natural follow-up that Emyvale Guild should have regular contact with the Womens Institute in Northern Ireland and many cross-border meetings were arranged. In addition, concerts were frequently staged and members took part in all competitions organised by ICA headquarters down through the years.
During the mid-sixties, the Guild was very much to the forefront in the raising of much needed finances for the establishment of a special needs school in Monaghan town. This was during the Presidency of Maura Gilsenan. Probably the best known President of the Guild's history was Roisin O'Brien who later became Federation President. Roisin died very suddenly in 1979 and was greatly missed by all. The Federation Chain of Office is dedicated to her memory. Guild members regularly provided valuable assistance to other local clubs and charitable organisations in many of the fundraising efforts; Conquer Cancer; The Irish Wheelchair Assocation and the National Council for the Blind, to name a few, all benefited from their efforts. The members also assisted with the annual Blood Transfusion Unit visits to the village. Members also helped out on a weekly basis with the Senior Citizens day in the Emyvale Leisure Centre, providing entertainment transport and also assistance with the provision of meals.
In February 1980, the Emyvale Guild "came of age" when it celebrated its 21st Birthday with a special function. This was during the Presidency of Gertie McNally and the occasion was honoured by the presence of the National ICA President Camilla Hannon. In June 1980, Mrs. Hannon was again in Emyvale when the Guild hosted The Summer Federation Meeting in the spacious ballroom of the Emyvale Inn. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s Emyvale Guild was very much to the fore of social life of women in North Monaghan. Members were also regular visitors to An Grianan and each year the Guild awarded scholarships to some of its members to attend courses there. Several members were awarded Brannrai for cooking and crafts as well as Arts Awards for Effective Speaking. Sadly due to falling membership in September 1999, Emyvale Guild closed. (Submitted by Nancy McCluskey, past member of Emyvale ICA Guild  – From Friendship and Fellowship ICA; the Monaghan Story; published by Monaghan Federation ICA 2010; Editor Patricia Cavanagh).

MULLAN: (Muilleann) - The Mill. Mahon MacMahon was Chieftain of Mullan.
1798 (towards the Act of Union) The Monaghan United Irishmen, as elsewhere, had to rely on the pike as a weapon of defence. (Pike is a weapon with a long wooden handle or shaft with spike formerly used by Infantry) Hence "factories" sprung up everywhere. There was a pike "factory" at Mullan on present site of the old Shoe factory. Mullan Mills, according to tradition, had been the centre of the Linen industry in the 18th and 19th century. Later it was known for the manufacture of Bullock Irish Serge. Then the village lay idle and deserted for many years. In 1924 a property belonging to James Pringle, M.P. for Fermanagh and Tyrone was purchased by James P. McKenna and Charles McCluskey. With the help of Fr. James Marron,PP, James Morrin of Monaghan and Francis o'Hanlon, a limited private company was formed. Funds poured in and equipment was purchased. The village was re-built and in June 1925, the new factory began producing boots. At the beginning the industry produced 2,500 pairs of boots per week and 20 key workers and 30 locals were employed. By October 1925, the factory was employing 80. It specialised in heavy and medium footwear; the MILL brand and BORDER Brand. Boylans took over the plant in 1944.
(From The Monaghan Story by the late Peadar Livingstone)

St. Patrick’s, Corracrin: In the 19th century, with the easing of the Penal Laws, an ambitious programme of Church building was undertaken in parishes throughout the Diocese of Clogher, and indeed throughout the whole Island of Ireland. Fr.Daniel McMullin, Parish Priest of Donagh at the time, acquired the site for St.Patrick's, Corracrin, from the Leslie Estate.
The Church, which bears the name of Fr.McMullin on its foundation stone, was built in 1811. The east wall faced the main road, of the time, evidence which still can be seen at the rear entrance to the cemetery. Access to the Church was via two doors on the east wall, one entrance for women and the other for men.
In the 1820s, a new stretch of road from Coolshannagh to the Two Trees at Creevelea was constructed. Some time later work began on remodelling St.Patrick's in view of the road realignment. The two existing doors were closed up and a new doorway and bell tower built on the northern gable. Access to the Church grounds from then on was via the new N2 road.
On Sunday 13th November 1898, the Church was finally dedicated by Most Rev.Dr.Owens, Bishop of Clogher. This ceremony could only take place when the building was debt free. The following is from an article which appeared in the Peoples Advocate, published on the 19th November 1898.
"A sum of £2,000 was expended by the good Parish Priest, the Rev.Felix McKenna, and the total amount received by that gentleman after the collection was taken up was £2,115. This generosity affords matter for thanks and congratulations -thanks to the loyal Irish Catholics who defrayed the debt, and congratulations to the energetic Parish Priest in attaining the end for which he so zealously worked".
Notes by Mary Lavery in booklet Celebrating 200 years St.Patrick's Church, Corracrin; Sunday 23rd October,2011. World Mission Sunday. Submitted by Nancy

‘1954 (60 years ago) will long be remembered as one of the worst years ever for bathing in Emy Lake. Scarcely a dozen people have enjoyed the pleasant waters of the lake this year. Owing to the continuous rain the waters of the lake have remained very high and access to the strand has been almost impossible. Only a very minor portion of the island (crannog) has appeared above the water-line. Prospects for the Autumn season do not appear any brighter’.
Dancing: Memories: Pat McGuigan and his orchestra make a welcome return to Emyvale Parochial Hall on Sunday night next after a long absence. The popular Castleblaney combination has not been heard in Emyvale since before the Lenten season.
(Taken from The Witness newspaper in the 50s.)


Sliabh Beagh/Bragan
is the mountainy area situated on the Monaghan/Fermanagh/Tyrone border. In the highest area the land rises to about 400m. The sloping nature of the rising land and the accessibility were both very conducive to the development of themany walks and nature trails which are a feature of the mountain to-day.
The mountain, for those l;iving in the North Monaghan area, has long been associated with the cutting and saving of turf or peat as a fuel for the months of Winter. This reached maximum development during the Emergency when Monaghan townspeople volunteered their services for the benefit of the town and public institutions. Generally the work was hard but the long Summer days and convivality of friends and neighbours turned it into a sort of "working holiday"
Among the legends associated with Sliabh Beagh are the story of Bith, son of Noah, from whom it is said the mountain got its name, and the saga of Shane Bearnach. Shane Bearnach was a displaced noble who lost his lands in the Plantation of Ulster (1600s) and became a famous raparee. Shane had two main hideouts, both called "Shane Bearnach stables", one was situated in the Pomeroy mountains, Co.Tyrone and the other at the highest point on Sliabh Beagh where the three counties of Fermanagh, Monaghan and Tyrone meet. When Shane and his brother were killed, Shane's wife threw her son. herself and a purse of gold into the many lakes which dot the mountain. The Parish of Errigal Truagh encompasses a large area of the Bragan end of Sliabh Beagh.
Above taken from: Monaghan - The County of Little Hills; Author Brian Deery (retired Primary School Teacher)

The old town clock of Monaghan was a splendid instrument. The maker was a man named Crosthwait (locally named Crosswhite) who was engaged at its construction for many months. It occupied a position in the old Courthouse in the Diamond, and on the removal of the Law Courts to the present building the clock was placed in the Established Parish Church which had just been completed. During the nineteenth century each successive watchmaker who "got at"; introduced some new "improvement", the great whalebone shafts were removed and replaced by metal. It was ultimately improved out of exestince, and has been replaced by a more modern instrument.
Taken from "Monaghan In The 18th Century" By Denis Carolan Rushe.
Nancy

A bit of Irish history. Irish emigration to the U.S.A did not begin with the Famine. As early as 1627, a large number of Irish people landed in Massachusetts. Also there was an Irish colony in Virginia in 1609 when an Irishman, Francis Maguire, wrote a history of the State (then a colony) for the information of the Spanish Government. This history, incidentally, was written in Irish, and Archbishop Conroy of Tuam translated it into Spanish. (From The Irish Digest, July 1965)

Ballinode (Bail Atha an Fhoid): The mouth of the ford of the sod. The Ordinance Survey Memoirs of 1834 described Ballinode as a "small straggling village in the townland of Mullaghmore West" It contained 29 cottages of one storey and a house of two storeys. They were all thatched and built of stone. Their appearance was not "very favourable". There were 4 publicans; l smith; l wheelwright; l tobacconist and l master. Lewis tells us in 184l that the village had a good stone bridge and a population of 215. It had a patent for a cattle fair on the first Saturday of every month but none was held. (submitted by Nancy, taken from "The Monaghan Story" by Peadar Livingstone).

Nancy has supplied me with this extract from The Corracrin Eagle (an t-Iolar) Friday l8th May, 1984 - over 30 years ago.

‘It has only recently come to light that a very valuable "Horde of Viking Silver" was found at Emyvale in the 18th century and is stored in the vaults of the National Museum in Dublin. It is NOT on public display and the Curator of Monaghan County Museum, Mr. Aiden Walsh, is presently making great efforts to have the horde transferred to the Museum in Monaghan. It is called "The Emyvale Horde and we hope it finds its way back to Monaghan where Emyvale folk may view what is part of their own heritage. This latest development, plus the bronze-age tomb unearthed in 1960 and the confirmation that bog-oak stumps found at Tully were part of a crannog stockade - all prove that our local village of Emyvale is one of the oldest inhabited settlements in Ireland’.

If anyone out there knows whether or not this transfer of "The Emyvale Horde" ever took place, please let us know.

The following snippets of local history has been supplied to me by Nancy McCluskey, Emyvale, who tells me she received this information from Annie Wright, (wife of Willie;) Elvey, Emyvale, some years ago:

In the year 1806 a new road was commenced between Monaghan and Aughnacloy, the Surveyor being Sir Charles Coote. In 1811 the old road was widened and new portions of the road made from Scarnageeragh (Emyvale) to

Aughnacloy via Dheariugh's Bridge. On the completion of this new road, the Mail Coach passed through Aughnacloy which was a great advantage. Before the stage coaches were taken off the road, horses were changed at Monaghan on one side and Brocham House on the other. The old coachings stables at Aughnacloy were in the backyard of the present doctor's house.

Moy School house in the townland of Moy was built in 1833. It cost £30 and was a plain stone building 33 ft. long and 18 ft. wide, with a thatched roof. It has since disappeared.

 

More History: In the year 1806 a new road was commenced between Monaghan and Aughnacloy, the Surveyor being Sir Charles Coote. In 1811 the old road was widened and new portions of the road made from Scarnageeragh (Emyvale) to Aughnacloy via Dheariugh's Bridge. On the completion of this new road, the Mail Coach passed through Aughnacloy which was a great advantage. Before the stage coaches were taken off the road, horses were changed at Monaghan on one side and Brocham House on the other. The old coachings stables at Aughnacloy were in the backyard of the present doctor's house.
Moy School house in the townland of Moy was built in 1833. It cost £30 and was a plain stone building 33 ft. long and 18 ft. wide, with a thatched roof. It has since disappeared.
This information was supplied by Annie Wright, (wife of Willie;) Elvey, Emyvale, to Nancy McCluskey some years ago.

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