All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Covid 19: Little did anyone think, as we welcomed in the New Year, that 2020 would bring us such devastation. The Old World is gone for good and in many ways it is no harm. Indeed when one looks at history and reads the Bible it seems that when humans lose their humanity and become convinced of their own invincibility and greed for worldly possession becomes rampant a major cataclysm hits the earth to bring man back to his senses and to assess what is important in this life. These have been a major war like World War 1 and World War 2, major nature upheavals, or pestilence or pandemic. It stops us in our tracks and makes us reassess our lives. Covid19 has hit the world and not just one country and it is difficult to think of any previous catastrophe that has been so worldwide. However when we think about it we have to agree that the poor, the downtrodden, the homeless and the destitute millions of humans in our world have been suffering and dying all the while that others become prosperous and greedy for more. The more we have they more we want and we will do anything to get what we want seems to have become the rule of thumb and even life itself becomes worthless. We had little warning that such a devastating virus was going to ravage our country and that our normal lives would have to be put on hold until the virus is defeated. However, meantime, it has made us all re-evaluate our lives and when freedom is restricted we adjust our thinking. Indeed this Covid has made us all more aware of the needy, of the lonely, the desolate, and the need for human contact and interaction. For many too it has made them turn to God to keep them safe, a God who was being rejected, ignored, and irrelevant. It has also made us more aware of the good people in society and how important they have been in doing what they do yet taken for granted and never getting the appreciation and respect they deserved. The generosity of people has been outstanding in recent months as groups and individuals organise a fundraising event, challenge, or request seeking funds for one of the very many charitable organisations and causes who are in dire need of financing in order to keep offering the services. Unfortunately the future looks bleak as, with the difficulties facing our economy, the Government, if we ever get one, will have to tax this that and everything in order to recoup the expenditure of these months and leave very little room for charitable fundraising. Many of the ‘old reliables’ will be struggling themselves, or indeed sadly gone out of business, and fewer pockets can be raided in order to support the charity. emyvale.net will also have to assess its capability of continuing as sponsorship dries up. The work of those responsible for making decisions as to how we can cope with the Coronavirus with some safety must be exhausting. Tony Holohan and his crew have done as good a job as could be expected against an unknown invader. Yes mistakes have been made but it would have taken foreknowledge to get it right all the time, but hindsight is always greater but by then it is too late. Our Government made announcements they were given and used every photo opportunity possible but the real heroes are the front line staff and all the assistants in our hospitals, together with our GPs. Successive Governments made life difficult for them but their worth to society has been proven beyond all doubt during these terrible times. Hopefully the Government will not use the downturn in the economy to continue to ignore the needs of these heroes. As with many problems in our health services the Government had a fall-back as, if something went wrong, there was always someone to blame but not a politician. And there is going to be a huge downturn as businesses try to get up and running again and some sadly will disappear altogether. There will also be the need to pay back the massive loans needed during these times. We already were deeply in debt to over €200billion and we are told this will add at least another €30billion to the account. Unfortunately the Government also made big mistakes. They were slow in getting started and then had to pay top dollar. They contracted Private Hospitals at €115million per month yet never needed 50% of them. At times it appeared that the image of the politician was more important than getting control of the virus. I did have sympathy for the Minister for Health as the responsibility rested on his shoulders and he also had to consider his family. He, in my mind, has paid a heavy price and I wish him well. Coping with the restrictions for me has been easy enough as I love gardening and the weather was terrific for that. I also had good friends who looked after our needs and we thank them for that. For seven weeks we did not venture out of our gates but it was annoying to see on TV and hear radio reports of those who were ignoring the restrictions and recommendations of the health experts. Imagine that extra money was spent on paying Gardai to check people who were taking risks and putting their own and other people’s lives in danger. At the same time I would be critical of some of the restrictions as not all over 70’s are at greater risk as some in their 60’s may be more vulnerable. As well 2km in a city or town is a fair distance and within that area there are many options whereas in rural Ireland 2km may not even take you to a neighbour’s laneway never mind to a shop. A 5km in a city is terrific but in rural Ireland does not give many options. My final point is that radio and TV could talk about little else and wore out every aspect of the virus, the restrictions, the number of positive cases and the death rate. There was little to cheer one up and to get any hope of a better future. But the deaths were the toughest of all – unable to be with a loved one at the final days or minutes before passing, unable to have a grieving process as Irish funerals have always been, unable to have a Mass and burial as customary, unable to be with and show close support to grieving relatives and it is very difficult to postpone grief. Hopefully we are over the worst of Covid19 though we must still keep to the restrictions (wash hands, wear masks, stay 2 metres apart, stay away from crowds etc etc) and with God’s help we will live to adjust to our new normal.
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Covid 19: Little did anyone think, as we welcomed in the New Year, that 2020 would bring us such devastation. The Old World is gone for good and in many ways it is no harm. Indeed when one looks at history and reads the Bible it seems that when humans lose their humanity and become convinced of their own invincibility and greed for worldly possession becomes rampant a major cataclysm hits the earth to bring man back to his senses and to assess what is important in this life. These have been a major war like World War 1 and World War 2, major nature upheavals, or pestilence or pandemic. It stops us in our tracks and makes us reassess our lives. Covid19 has hit the world and not just one country and it is difficult to think of any previous catastrophe that has been so worldwide. However when we think about it we have to agree that the poor, the downtrodden, the homeless and the destitute millions of humans in our world have been suffering and dying all the while that others become prosperous and greedy for more. The more we have they more we want and we will do anything to get what we want seems to have become the rule of thumb and even life itself becomes worthless. We had little warning that such a devastating virus was going to ravage our country and that our normal lives would have to be put on hold until the virus is defeated. However, meantime, it has made us all re-evaluate our lives and when freedom is restricted we adjust our thinking. Indeed this Covid has made us all more aware of the needy, of the lonely, the desolate, and the need for human contact and interaction. For many too it has made them turn to God to keep them safe, a God who was being rejected, ignored, and irrelevant. It has also made us more aware of the good people in society and how important they have been in doing what they do yet taken for granted and never getting the appreciation and respect they deserved. The generosity of people has been outstanding in recent months as groups and individuals organise a fundraising event, challenge, or request seeking funds for one of the very many charitable organisations and causes who are in dire need of financing in order to keep offering the services. Unfortunately the future looks bleak as, with the difficulties facing our economy, the Government, if we ever get one, will have to tax this that and everything in order to recoup the expenditure of these months and leave very little room for charitable fundraising. Many of the ‘old reliables’ will be struggling themselves, or indeed sadly gone out of business, and fewer pockets can be raided in order to support the charity. emyvale.net will also have to assess its capability of continuing as sponsorship dries up. The work of those responsible for making decisions as to how we can cope with the Coronavirus with some safety must be exhausting. Tony Holohan and his crew have done as good a job as could be expected against an unknown invader. Yes mistakes have been made but it would have taken foreknowledge to get it right all the time, but hindsight is always greater but by then it is too late. Our Government made announcements they were given and used every photo opportunity possible but the real heroes are the front line staff and all the assistants in our hospitals, together with our GPs. Successive Governments made life difficult for them but their worth to society has been proven beyond all doubt during these terrible times. Hopefully the Government will not use the downturn in the economy to continue to ignore the needs of these heroes. As with many problems in our health services the Government had a fall-back as, if something went wrong, there was always someone to blame but not a politician. And there is going to be a huge downturn as businesses try to get up and running again and some sadly will disappear altogether. There will also be the need to pay back the massive loans needed during these times. We already were deeply in debt to over €200billion and we are told this will add at least another €30billion to the account. Unfortunately the Government also made big mistakes. They were slow in getting started and then had to pay top dollar. They contracted Private Hospitals at €115million per month yet never needed 50% of them. At times it appeared that the image of the politician was more important than getting control of the virus. I did have sympathy for the Minister for Health as the responsibility rested on his shoulders and he also had to consider his family. He, in my mind, has paid a heavy price and I wish him well. Coping with the restrictions for me has been easy enough as I love gardening and the weather was terrific for that. I also had good friends who looked after our needs and we thank them for that. For seven weeks we did not venture out of our gates but it was annoying to see on TV and hear radio reports of those who were ignoring the restrictions and recommendations of the health experts. Imagine that extra money was spent on paying Gardai to check people who were taking risks and putting their own and other people’s lives in danger. At the same time I would be critical of some of the restrictions as not all over 70’s are at greater risk as some in their 60’s may be more vulnerable. As well 2km in a city or town is a fair distance and within that area there are many options whereas in rural Ireland 2km may not even take you to a neighbour’s laneway never mind to a shop. A 5km in a city is terrific but in rural Ireland does not give many options. My final point is that radio and TV could talk about little else and wore out every aspect of the virus, the restrictions, the number of positive cases and the death rate. There was little to cheer one up and to get any hope of a better future. But the deaths were the toughest of all – unable to be with a loved one at the final days or minutes before passing, unable to have a grieving process as Irish funerals have always been, unable to have a Mass and burial as customary, unable to be with and show close support to grieving relatives and it is very difficult to postpone grief. Hopefully we are over the worst of Covid19 though we must still keep to the restrictions (wash hands, wear masks, stay 2 metres apart, stay away from crowds etc etc) and with God’s help we will live to adjust to our new normal.