All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Greetings. Hope you are still surviving the long lockdown. Here, we are blessed in that the virus is only coming and going in stages. When we have cold spells – it seems to emerge from hibernation - otherwise it doesn’t impinge on us too much - so we can move around freely without masks in brilliant sunshine - so we are the lucky ones. But as one of our Church members exclaimed when I was speaking about the virus – she said the only Corona we have to fear here in South Sudan is VIOLENCE We got a new member to our Irish community here in Rumbek - Noeleen Loughran. She was advised to move to Rumbek so that she could have the support of myself, Sr. Orla Treacy and Fr. Alan Neville, who also recently came to be chaplain for the Loreto and De La Salle Schools. Noeleen will work closely with the Missionaries of Charity and the Evangelizing Sisters on street children and women projects here in Rumbek. We warmly welcome her to Rumbek. Despite the lockdown of schools and churches closed we continue with different ministries here. I had a funny experience a few weeks ago when I was out visiting our women’s garden project . They offered us some food and just as I was about the put a piece of goat meat in my mouth an eagle swept down and took it off my plate !!! That’s what an eagle eye is all about !!! The women’s garden project: Fr. Nolasco who is the other Spiritan Priest living and working with me is a very good horticularist and has a very good women’s vegetable garden project based around boreholes. As South Sudan only gets rain for 7 months of the year – it means that there are 5 months without a drop of rain – so impossible to grow any food. I came back to South Sudan in November and I have not seen a drop of rain since coming back. Hence it is very important to support these women that have taken the initiative to grow food for their families around the water boreholes. It costs us 12000 euros to bore down 80 meters to find water and then to put on a handpump. While waiting for the crops to mature – we also help with some food distribution – especially to the most vulnerable. Some of the challenges here can be quite daunting. The photo of this young girl is when she was brought to the Mother Teresa sisters. She had burns on her back and it was discovered that the family believed that she had TB of the spine and tried to cure her by burning it out of her. This is why the preaching of the Gospel and education is so important here – to help stop such cruel practices. We are also continuing to build new classrooms in preparation for the time when schools will reopen again That is just a taste of some of the challenges and joys of mission life in South Sudan. Stay blessed. John
Fr. John 9 BACK
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Fr. John 9 BACK
Greetings. Hope you are still surviving the long lockdown. Here, we are blessed in that the virus is only coming and going in stages. When we have cold spells – it seems to emerge from hibernation - otherwise it doesn’t impinge on us too much - so we can move around freely without masks in brilliant sunshine - so we are the lucky ones. But as one of our Church members exclaimed when I was speaking about the virus – she said the only Corona we have to fear here in South Sudan is VIOLENCE We got a new member to our Irish community here in Rumbek - Noeleen Loughran. She was advised to move to Rumbek so that she could have the support of myself, Sr. Orla Treacy and Fr. Alan Neville, who also recently came to be chaplain for the Loreto and De La Salle Schools. Noeleen will work closely with the Missionaries of Charity and the Evangelizing Sisters on street children and women projects here in Rumbek. We warmly welcome her to Rumbek. Despite the lockdown of schools and churches closed we continue with different ministries here. I had a funny experience a few weeks ago when I was out visiting our women’s garden project . They offered us some food and just as I was about the put a piece of goat meat in my mouth an eagle swept down and took it off my plate !!! That’s what an eagle eye is all about !!! The women’s garden project: Fr. Nolasco who is the other Spiritan Priest living and working with me is a very good horticularist and has a very good women’s vegetable garden project based around boreholes. As South Sudan only gets rain for 7 months of the year – it means that there are 5 months without a drop of rain – so impossible to grow any food. I came back to South Sudan in November and I have not seen a drop of rain since coming back. Hence it is very important to support these women that have taken the initiative to grow food for their families around the water boreholes. It costs us 12000 euros to bore down 80 meters to find water and then to put on a handpump. While waiting for the crops to mature – we also help with some food distribution – especially to the most vulnerable. Some of the challenges here can be quite daunting. The photo of this young girl is when she was brought to the Mother Teresa sisters. She had burns on her back and it was discovered that the family believed that she had TB of the spine and tried to cure her by burning it out of her. This is why the preaching of the Gospel and education is so important here – to help stop such cruel practices. We are also continuing to build new classrooms in preparation for the time when schools will reopen again That is just a taste of some of the challenges and joys of mission life in South Sudan. Stay blessed. John