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Up Glaslough Recent Triumph of Harrier Club. ‘Roddy The Rover’ Gives Rousing Account. April 26th 1946 In the interesting corner “Seen Heard and Noted” in the Irish Press that well-known columnist “Roddy The Rover” gave the following account of the recent Cross-Country test at Glaslough. Here is the Prose Ballad There was a great day in Tullyree field , Glaslough, County Monaghan, when a cross-country run was run with 36 competitors from (1) Glaslough, (2) rest of Ulster, and (3) Dowdallshill, Co. Louth. It would remind you of the poem: Three Jolly Farmers. Each bet a pound, He would dance the others, off the ground – for that is what the three dozen sturdy fellows did. I wish I had known of the meeting in time to go to it, but next best thing, I have an account from one of the runners, which reads as rousingly as a ballad. I will give this prose ballad just as it reached me. Frank Forde with his Donagh Band played the teams and hundreds of spectators to the big field in Sir Shane Leslie’s estate – 200 acres of parkland with a lake and a huge belt of trees in the very centre of the mile-odd circuit. There was no prize at stake; just the honour and the glory. Three dozen stalwarts of Ulster and Leinster got off to a fast start when Captain Sean Ig Leslie dropped the flag: or rather his walking stick. Of the 36 starters, 27 were farmers. Most of them had been working late every evening of late in the Spring sowings. One of them, John Curley, who farms 150 acres am dos captain of the Glaslough runners, was heard to remark: If only I had the corn sown a week earlier I’d fear nothing on two legs from here to the bay of Dundalk. Wait till you hear how he fared. Away they went. The flaming red Dowdallshill singlet was conspicuous in that first headlong rush to get the lead but John Curley took the lead and led the field first time round. A merry pace this son of Turlough set as you could see by the strained faces of the others as they chased the Glaslough Star in the second lap too. A quick tally showed the Monaghan men with a slight lead over their Louth neighbours but the rest of Ulster made a poor third. That lap saw little change. Curley still held grimly to his lead and the field was spread out ribbon-like for nearly half a mile. Two laps over and three to go Paddy Kerley, the big Louth champion wrested Curley’s lead Excuse my interruption but I often heard of what happens when Hardy comes to Hardy; but this was where Kerley came to Curley – RR. But the Monaghan runner, iron man that he is, was making this no parlour game for the Louth-man, and he chased for all he was worth into the fourth mile. Entering the fifth mile the Glaslough team had increased its lead and it was all over now for the invaders barring a miracle. Round by the Lake they sped in that last ‘do or die effort’. Spectators foregathered for the home straight making a half-mile lane. Paddy Kerley was racing a hundred yards ahead of Curley with Carlin (Derry) and Fitzsimmons (Glaslough)straining every muscle to gain valuable points. How the cheers rang as the finishers sped up the hundred yards, while the recorders checked off numbers and what duels were fought as Louth-men and Ulster-men vied for the last inches. Names were sung out: Paddy Kerley, John Curley, Pat Ferris, Billy Carlin, Nial Fitzsimmons, Pat McEnearney, Tony Reid, John Todd, Mick and Harry McKenna, Peter McKernan, Luke Todd, Kevin Lynch, Noel McGee, Sean Mulligan, Jim Vallely, and Pat Mullen. Hurra for all of them. Score Sheet: Glaslough 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 – 41 Dowdallshill: 1,3,6, 13,17,18 – 58 Rest of Ulster: 98 (Who fears to speak of 98? - Roddy) For individual honours in this Homeric contest it was a Kerley-Curley victory and a credit to the names. Mac Fhearghaile and Mac Thoirdhealbhaigh The Louthmen sportingly congratulated the victors and all sat down to a feast in a big barn. The monetary proceeds of the event were sent to the Medical Missionaries of Mary at Drogheda and the good Sisters must be delighted that a clean, healthy manly pastime brought them this gift. Nothing else is the talk at the firesides and crossroads of Omagh, Truagh and Tyholland – how the Monaghan heroes met the invasion of the champions from all surrounding districts as far as Foyle’s banks and Ballinamuck, whence Daly brought the Dromard Athletic Club. Up Monaghan: say I. Ditto – Roddy. April 26th 1946.
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Harrier News: Harrier Awards HERE
Up Glaslough Recent Triumph of Harrier Club. ‘Roddy The Rover’ Gives Rousing Account. April 26th 1946 In the interesting corner “Seen Heard and Noted” in the Irish Press that well-known columnist “Roddy The Rover” gave the following account of the recent Cross-Country test at Glaslough. Here is the Prose Ballad There was a great day in Tullyree field , Glaslough, County Monaghan, when a cross-country run was run with 36 competitors from (1) Glaslough, (2) rest of Ulster, and (3) Dowdallshill, Co. Louth. It would remind you of the poem: Three Jolly Farmers. Each bet a pound, He would dance the others, off the ground – for that is what the three dozen sturdy fellows did. I wish I had known of the meeting in time to go to it, but next best thing, I have an account from one of the runners, which reads as rousingly as a ballad. I will give this prose ballad just as it reached me. Frank Forde with his Donagh Band played the teams and hundreds of spectators to the big field in Sir Shane Leslie’s estate – 200 acres of parkland with a lake and a huge belt of trees in the very centre of the mile-odd circuit. There was no prize at stake; just the honour and the glory. Three dozen stalwarts of Ulster and Leinster got off to a fast start when Captain Sean Ig Leslie dropped the flag: or rather his walking stick. Of the 36 starters, 27 were farmers. Most of them had been working late every evening of late in the Spring sowings. One of them, John Curley, who farms 150 acres am dos captain of the Glaslough runners, was heard to remark: If only I had the corn sown a week earlier I’d fear nothing on two legs from here to the bay of Dundalk. Wait till you hear how he fared. Away they went. The flaming red Dowdallshill singlet was conspicuous in that first headlong rush to get the lead but John Curley took the lead and led the field first time round. A merry pace this son of Turlough set as you could see by the strained faces of the others as they chased the Glaslough Star in the second lap too. A quick tally showed the Monaghan men with a slight lead over their Louth neighbours but the rest of Ulster made a poor third. That lap saw little change. Curley still held grimly to his lead and the field was spread out ribbon-like for nearly half a mile. Two laps over and three to go Paddy Kerley, the big Louth champion wrested Curley’s lead Excuse my interruption but I often heard of what happens when Hardy comes to Hardy; but this was where Kerley came to Curley – RR. But the Monaghan runner, iron man that he is, was making this no parlour game for the Louth-man, and he chased for all he was worth into the fourth mile. Entering the fifth mile the Glaslough team had increased its lead and it was all over now for the invaders barring a miracle. Round by the Lake they sped in that last ‘do or die effort’. Spectators foregathered for the home straight making a half-mile lane. Paddy Kerley was racing a hundred yards ahead of Curley with Carlin (Derry) and Fitzsimmons (Glaslough)straining every muscle to gain valuable points. How the cheers rang as the finishers sped up the hundred yards, while the recorders checked off numbers and what duels were fought as Louth-men and Ulster-men vied for the last inches. Names were sung out: Paddy Kerley, John Curley, Pat Ferris, Billy Carlin, Nial Fitzsimmons, Pat McEnearney, Tony Reid, John Todd, Mick and Harry McKenna, Peter McKernan, Luke Todd, Kevin Lynch, Noel McGee, Sean Mulligan, Jim Vallely, and Pat Mullen. Hurra for all of them. Score Sheet: Glaslough 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 – 41 Dowdallshill: 1,3,6, 13,17,18 – 58 Rest of Ulster: 98 (Who fears to speak of 98? - Roddy) For individual honours in this Homeric contest it was a Kerley- Curley victory and a credit to the names. Mac Fhearghaile and Mac Thoirdhealbhaigh The Louthmen sportingly congratulated the victors and all sat down to a feast in a big barn. The monetary proceeds of the event were sent to the Medical Missionaries of Mary at Drogheda and the good Sisters must be delighted that a clean, healthy manly pastime brought them this gift. Nothing else is the talk at the firesides and crossroads of Omagh, Truagh and Tyholland – how the Monaghan heroes met the invasion of the champions from all surrounding districts as far as Foyle’s banks and Ballinamuck, whence Daly brought the Dromard Athletic Club. Up Monaghan: say I. Ditto – Roddy. April 26th 1946.