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Inhabitants 2: Some more residents of Emyvale in 1939 and once again I need assistance with the people named as to who or what they were and where they lived. Unfortunately most of the people, who could tell me, have passed to their eternal reward but it would be great if we can fill as many spaces as possible as the memories are fading and the information will be lost forever if we don’t do it now.
A Delaney, Farmer. Arthur with two sisters lived where the Flynn family now reside. One of the family emigrated to PEI in the 1800’s and a descendant married the late Brendan O’Grady, who was the first to establish the close connection between PEI and Monaghan. Arthur had a little dairy business and I remember all the times I was sent with my tin can to get the daily supply of milk. The two sisters were called - Chris and Mary Ann. F. Callaghan, Butcher. The Callaghan family lived in the last house on the left as you leave the village towards Monaghan - it is now owned by Hollands. Their shop was beside the DPC where the Leisure Centre is now. Brigid Callaghan lived round the corner on the road to McCreedy’s/Gola beside a Mr. McKeever and I recall her great voice singing ‘Sweet Sixteen’. A member of the Callaghan family has made contact. He is David, son of Daniel (Danny) and the family are known as O’Callaghan though the O was not used by the locals here. Danny had two brothers -Sonny married to Brigid and Jim who was married to Mary from Ballyoisin. They had two children Frank and Paddy. Danny also had sisters - Catherine, Bridie and Margaret (Teenie). When Danny and the family emigrated to England around 1950 the Butcher Shop was taken over by Jim who carried on the business for a number of years but then he too with the family emigrated to be along with the rest of the O’Callaghans in London.If my memory serves me right Mary died giving birth to one of the children and is buried in Corracrin. It is thought that Sonny and Brigid also emigrated. David would love to talk to anyone who knew his father, Danny. If you knew Danny get in touch with me. I have also been informed that they had a Butsher Shop in Scotstown from 1945 to 1950 in a leased premises. P. Quinn, Sergeant: The Quinn family lived beside the Doctor’s, where Patsy Whelan lives now. A son of the Sgt lives in England and calls now and again. He was a great friend of Seamus McCluskey and was very involved in community before they left for England. I have been in touch quite recently as he likes to be kept up to date with Emyvale. Wm. Kelly, Blacksmith: To write about Willie Kelly and the Kelly family would take a book as they were central to all that was happening in Emyvale and beyond. Perhaps I will write a separate piece on this family later and if you want to contribute to it please email me your memories etc. James Treanor, Blacksmith. he is a relation to the McMeels (Peter and Arthur) and had his workshop beside the McMeel house at the top of the town - now demolished in the last lorry crash at the corner. He was originally from Dunmadigan I’m told and a brother of James McMeel’s wife. He was a great reader and loved to discuss and talk about in particular Walter Scott and Dickens. Robert Finlay, Farmer: His land was at the top of the village on the right hand side and we used to play there. The large house, which was demolished as a result of a Lorry Crash at the corner some years ago, was Finlay’s for a time but I am told that before that the house was built by a member of the Briney clan and he lived there before Finlay. After Finlay there was a number of inhabitants there including: Vincent McQuaid, a Custom man called Mr. McGrath, Tommy McConnon, Jim McQuaid, Seamus McCaffrey, Jim Murphy and more recently manager in Silverhill. Can anyone add to that? Alex Shaw, Farmer: Alex and his brother, John (see below), lived in the last house on the left as you head towards Aughnacloy. The house has been levelled but was sited where the pump is now. Alex and John Shaw – I can see them sitting outside the door and a Summers evening – A Mrs Aikhurst lived there after they died and she sold flowers made from coloured tissue paper dipped in wax. After her Bella Ward from Rarutra lived there for a time.(Maeve) Patrick Lavery, Bread Server. Lived in the house now owned by Paul Gormley, opposite Paul’s home house and shop. I remember his delivery bicycle with the crate on the front to carry the bread. I’m not sure if he was related to the Lavery family, Monaghan, or Willie in Oriel Park but maybe someone out there knows. Wm. Wilkinson, There were two Wilkinson families, one in the now vancant house at McKenna’s Filling Station and the other across the road where Fergus Murray lives. I think it was William who lived in the second house mentioned here. He farmed. Jas. McKenna, Carpenter? P. Phillips, shoemaker. Paddy lived alone in a little ‘shack’ in the field where the little housing estate is now. He repaired shoes and boots. His only source of lighting in the house was a little oil lamp. He was a quiet reserved man but a great story teller and obviously a very intelligent person. I spent many an hour with him listening to his stories, as we lived on the other side of the street at the time.. Paddy had a sister Mary – I don’t remember her but her name was always included on the November dead list along with Paddy ( I was charged with writing the list. (Maeve) James, McAree, Carpenter. he was father to Seamus, who lived in a house now demolished and replaced with a new and recessed house. He was highly regarded as a fantastic carpenter and was also known as a good fisherman. I can recall seeing him heading off to the river with his fishing rods and bag and I knew there was a flood down. Many houses in North Monaghan would still have examples of his handiwork. P. O’Neill, Fowl dealer: Paddy O’Neill was another great character in Emyvale. They bought fowl and especially turkeys for Christmas. He was a progressive man and his house was one of the first to get a TV in the Village and they also had a taxi service, which son, Eddie, looked after. Paddy had been in the army and in the local LDF (FCA of today). My father used tell some great stories about Paddy in the LDF during World War 11. His house was a great ceiliing place especially on a Saturday night as Joe Fields, from Dernashallog, used cut hair there and there would be a queue every Saturday night and plenty of chat and stories. H. Wilkinson, postman. This man lived at the now filling station and his son, William, built the house just across the bridge on the right hand side. J. Hughes, postman and watch maker. he was called ‘Big John’ as he was very tall and he and family lived on Main Street where the Pharmacy is now. They later moved to Oriel Park when it opened. His son, Jim (Jamser, as he was called), was a well known character in the village but a man who would put himself out to help anyone who needed help. He worked, among other jobs, in McCaffrey’s Yard making Concrete blocks and I was involved there and he could keep the other workers amused all day. M. Kilroy, Civic Guard: A very well-known and respected member of the Gardai who spent most of his working life in Emyvale. He knew every man, woman and child and if any crime was committed in the North Monaghan area he would know who would do such an act as soon as it was reported. When he retired I took over from him as Tillage Collector in the Emyvale Electoral Area and it was terrific to hear the great praise there was for him and how they missed him calling. He had three sons - Michael, Martin and Sean. J. Clancy, Civic Guard Guard Forde, ? Guard Kirby ? S. McPhillips NT: Principal of Edenmore NS who used board in McCluskey’s Hotel but then moved to Coolshannagh when he married. He was very much involved in Community work in Donagh parish and would always hev everything oprganised to the last and every possibility covered. M.J. Kelly ? Miss Maguire, NT: Became Mrs. Hackett when married to Benny. She was in digs in Charlie McCluskey’s and came on a Monday morning on the bus from Castleblayney and back on a Friday evening. At that time McCluskeys was the centre of activity and she told the story of Ernest Blythe who was Minister for Education in that government coming to the area and dinner for him was in McCluskeys. She was asked to dinner and declined as the same Mr. Blythe had just taken a shilling a week off the teachers. Bet that went down well! She loved Charlie and Mrs Mc Cluskey and I have some of the poetry. She then moved up to the house where her daughter lives now and my mother, Maggie Jo, and her shared the house for a period. I know that every Summer when she was mending sheets etc., on the machine, the sewing machine was in front of the kitchen window and she would say that Maggie Jo found it the best place for light. Maureen was one of the teachers in Edenmore and usually had the infants and junior infants. Every time I hear her name I can smell ‘plasticine’ as I always looked forward to the days when she would give us plasticine to make little shapes. She was like a mother to every child in her care and was also the first ‘woman driver’ that I knew as she came to school in a Prefect Car while the Master was on a bicycle. She is survived by her daughter Maeve and son, Oliver. I am inserting in a little extra narrative on Benny as he was a major contributor to community life in Emyvale as well as working in the shop. He was very involved in the Development Association work and was of great assistance to many individuals who needed good advice and help. He was involved in many of the projects, which added to the quality of life for the villagers and visitors alike. He also played a major role in the life of the Church throughout his life time. he married Maureen Maguire and they set up home in the house described above. Maggie Jo also married and lived two doors away for a number of years and they both remained lifetime friends. Miss McKenna NT This could be the Mary McKenna, who owned the house belonging to Barney Kerr which is more or less opposite the Oratory. Kerr’s House was owned by Margaret O’Brien and it passed to Francis O’Brien in 1907, then to Michael McGuinness in 1918, and to Rose McKenna in 1925, and by will Harold Swan passed it to Mary McKenna in 1936 and then in 1944 Harold Swan conveyed it for Mary McMeel to Charles and Kathleen Lynch who in turn handed it over (sold I presume) to James Boylan in 1948 from whom the late Barney Kerr purchased it. I don’t know a date for that transfer but it is interesting to get the story of a House on Main street. Thanks to Benita and Nancy for providing the information. I may not have used the proper legal wording for the different transactions but you get the story. I am also told that it was called Ashley House in its time but why it had that name I do not know. Thanks to Nancy and Benita Kerr for all this information. P. Gallagher, Customs John Shaw, Postman: Lived in last house on left hand side as you leave the village for Aughnacloy and hence the corner is called Shaw’s Corner’. The house is demolished and he and his brother who lived with him have passed to their eternal reward. Mrs. Russell ? Charles Faber Callan ex NT We are told that he was a teacher in Knockconan NS. He was a great poet and had his poems published in the Dundalk Democrat and in the Northern Standard. He was married to Mrs. Callan, who was also a teacher but we are not sure what school she taught in. They has a son who died in infancy. They lived opposite the High House in the house owned by the O’Neills. All three are buried in Corracrin. Mrs. Callan NT see above Nurse McGreevy. Mother of Raymond and Fr. Gerard. her husband died young. She was a Midwife and assisted at the birth of many inhabitants of the village and surrounding area. Nurse Geddis ?
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All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Inhabitants 2: Some more residents of Emyvale in 1939 and once again I need assistance with the people named as to who or what they were and where they lived. Unfortunately most of the people, who could tell me, have passed to their eternal reward but it would be great if we can fill as many spaces as possible as the memories are fading and the information will be lost forever if we don’t do it now.
Archives
A Delaney, Farmer. Arthur with two sisters lived where the Flynn family now reside. One of the family emigrated to PEI in the 1800’s and a descendant married the late Brendan O’Grady, who was the first to establish the close connection between PEI and Monaghan. Arthur had a little dairy business and I remember all the times I was sent with my tin can to get the daily supply of milk. The two sisters were called - Chris and Mary Ann. F. Callaghan, Butcher. The Callaghan family lived in the last house on the left as you leave the village towards Monaghan - it is now owned by Hollands. Their shop was beside the DPC where the Leisure Centre is now. Brigid Callaghan lived round the corner on the road to McCreedy’s/Gola beside a Mr. McKeever and I recall her great voice singing ‘Sweet Sixteen’. A member of the Callaghan family has made contact. He is David, son of Daniel (Danny) and the family are known as O’Callaghan though the O was not used by the locals here. Danny had two brothers -Sonny married to Brigid and Jim who was married to Mary from Ballyoisin. They had two children Frank and Paddy. Danny also had sisters - Catherine, Bridie and Margaret (Teenie). When Danny and the family emigrated to England around 1950 the Butcher Shop was taken over by Jim who carried on the business for a number of years but then he too with the family emigrated to be along with the rest of the O’Callaghans in London.If my memory serves me right Mary died giving birth to one of the children and is buried in Corracrin. It is thought that Sonny and Brigid also emigrated. David would love to talk to anyone who knew his father, Danny. If you knew Danny get in touch with me. I have also been informed that they had a Butsher Shop in Scotstown from 1945 to 1950 in a leased premises. P. Quinn, Sergeant: The Quinn family lived beside the Doctor’s, where Patsy Whelan lives now. A son of the Sgt lives in England and calls now and again. He was a great friend of Seamus McCluskey and was very involved in community before they left for England. I have been in touch quite recently as he likes to be kept up to date with Emyvale. Wm. Kelly, Blacksmith: To write about Willie Kelly and the Kelly family would take a book as they were central to all that was happening in Emyvale and beyond. Perhaps I will write a separate piece on this family later and if you want to contribute to it please email me your memories etc. James Treanor, Blacksmith. he is a relation to the McMeels (Peter and Arthur) and had his workshop beside the McMeel house at the top of the town - now demolished in the last lorry crash at the corner. He was originally from Dunmadigan I’m told and a brother of James McMeel’s wife. He was a great reader and loved to discuss and talk about in particular Walter Scott and Dickens. Robert Finlay, Farmer: His land was at the top of the village on the right hand side and we used to play there. The large house, which was demolished as a result of a Lorry Crash at the corner some years ago, was Finlay’s for a time but I am told that before that the house was built by a member of the Briney clan and he lived there before Finlay. After Finlay there was a number of inhabitants there including: Vincent McQuaid, a Custom man called Mr. McGrath, Tommy McConnon, Jim McQuaid, Seamus McCaffrey, Jim Murphy and more recently manager in Silverhill. Can anyone add to that? Alex Shaw, Farmer: Alex and his brother, John (see below), lived in the last house on the left as you head towards Aughnacloy. The house has been levelled but was sited where the pump is now. Alex and John Shaw – I can see them sitting outside the door and a Summers evening – A Mrs Aikhurst lived there after they died and she sold flowers made from coloured tissue paper dipped in wax. After her Bella Ward from Rarutra lived there for a time.(Maeve) Patrick Lavery, Bread Server. Lived in the house now owned by Paul Gormley, opposite Paul’s home house and shop. I remember his delivery bicycle with the crate on the front to carry the bread. I’m not sure if he was related to the Lavery family, Monaghan, or Willie in Oriel Park but maybe someone out there knows. Wm. Wilkinson, There were two Wilkinson families, one in the now vancant house at McKenna’s Filling Station and the other across the road where Fergus Murray lives. I think it was William who lived in the second house mentioned here. He farmed. Jas. McKenna, Carpenter? P. Phillips, shoemaker. Paddy lived alone in a little ‘shack’ in the field where the little housing estate is now. He repaired shoes and boots. His only source of lighting in the house was a little oil lamp. He was a quiet reserved man but a great story teller and obviously a very intelligent person. I spent many an hour with him listening to his stories, as we lived on the other side of the street at the time.. Paddy had a sister Mary – I don’t remember her but her name was always included on the November dead list along with Paddy ( I was charged with writing the list. (Maeve) James, McAree, Carpenter. he was father to Seamus, who lived in a house now demolished and replaced with a new and recessed house. He was highly regarded as a fantastic carpenter and was also known as a good fisherman. I can recall seeing him heading off to the river with his fishing rods and bag and I knew there was a flood down. Many houses in North Monaghan would still have examples of his handiwork. P. O’Neill, Fowl dealer: Paddy O’Neill was another great character in Emyvale. They bought fowl and especially turkeys for Christmas. He was a progressive man and his house was one of the first to get a TV in the Village and they also had a taxi service, which son, Eddie, looked after. Paddy had been in the army and in the local LDF (FCA of today). My father used tell some great stories about Paddy in the LDF during World War 11. His house was a great ceiliing place especially on a Saturday night as Joe Fields, from Dernashallog, used cut hair there and there would be a queue every Saturday night and plenty of chat and stories. H. Wilkinson, postman. This man lived at the now filling station and his son, William, built the house just across the bridge on the right hand side. J. Hughes, postman and watch maker. he was called ‘Big John’ as he was very tall and he and family lived on Main Street where the Pharmacy is now. They later moved to Oriel Park when it opened. His son, Jim (Jamser, as he was called), was a well known character in the village but a man who would put himself out to help anyone who needed help. He worked, among other jobs, in McCaffrey’s Yard making Concrete blocks and I was involved there and he could keep the other workers amused all day. M. Kilroy, Civic Guard: A very well-known and respected member of the Gardai who spent most of his working life in Emyvale. He knew every man, woman and child and if any crime was committed in the North Monaghan area he would know who would do such an act as soon as it was reported. When he retired I took over from him as Tillage Collector in the Emyvale Electoral Area and it was terrific to hear the great praise there was for him and how they missed him calling. He had three sons - Michael, Martin and Sean. J. Clancy, Civic Guard Guard Forde, ? Guard Kirby ? S. McPhillips NT: Principal of Edenmore NS who used board in McCluskey’s Hotel but then moved to Coolshannagh when he married. He was very much involved in Community work in Donagh parish and would always hev everything oprganised to the last and every possibility covered. M.J. Kelly ? Miss Maguire, NT: Became Mrs. Hackett when married to Benny. She was in digs in Charlie McCluskey’s and came on a Monday morning on the bus from Castleblayney and back on a Friday evening. At that time McCluskeys was the centre of activity and she told the story of Ernest Blythe who was Minister for Education in that government coming to the area and dinner for him was in McCluskeys. She was asked to dinner and declined as the same Mr. Blythe had just taken a shilling a week off the teachers. Bet that went down well! She loved Charlie and Mrs Mc Cluskey and I have some of the poetry. She then moved up to the house where her daughter lives now and my mother, Maggie Jo, and her shared the house for a period. I know that every Summer when she was mending sheets etc., on the machine, the sewing machine was in front of the kitchen window and she would say that Maggie Jo found it the best place for light. Maureen was one of the teachers in Edenmore and usually had the infants and junior infants. Every time I hear her name I can smell ‘plasticine’ as I always looked forward to the days when she would give us plasticine to make little shapes. She was like a mother to every child in her care and was also the first ‘woman driver’ that I knew as she came to school in a Prefect Car while the Master was on a bicycle. She is survived by her daughter Maeve and son, Oliver. I am inserting in a little extra narrative on Benny as he was a major contributor to community life in Emyvale as well as working in the shop. He was very involved in the Development Association work and was of great assistance to many individuals who needed good advice and help. He was involved in many of the projects, which added to the quality of life for the villagers and visitors alike. He also played a major role in the life of the Church throughout his life time. he married Maureen Maguire and they set up home in the house described above. Maggie Jo also married and lived two doors away for a number of years and they both remained lifetime friends. Miss McKenna NT This could be the Mary McKenna, who owned the house belonging to Barney Kerr which is more or less opposite the Oratory. Kerr’s House was owned by Margaret O’Brien and it passed to Francis O’Brien in 1907, then to Michael McGuinness in 1918, and to Rose McKenna in 1925, and by will Harold Swan passed it to Mary McKenna in 1936 and then in 1944 Harold Swan conveyed it for Mary McMeel to Charles and Kathleen Lynch who in turn handed it over (sold I presume) to James Boylan in 1948 from whom the late Barney Kerr purchased it. I don’t know a date for that transfer but it is interesting to get the story of a House on Main street. Thanks to Benita and Nancy for providing the information. I may not have used the proper legal wording for the different transactions but you get the story. I am also told that it was called Ashley House in its time but why it had that name I do not know. Thanks to Nancy and Benita Kerr for all this information. P. Gallagher, Customs John Shaw, Postman: Lived in last house on left hand side as you leave the village for Aughnacloy and hence the corner is called Shaw’s Corner’. The house is demolished and he and his brother who lived with him have passed to their eternal reward. Mrs. Russell ? Charles Faber Callan ex NT We are told that he was a teacher in Knockconan NS. He was a great poet and had his poems published in the Dundalk Democrat and in the Northern Standard. He was married to Mrs. Callan, who was also a teacher but we are not sure what school she taught in. They has a son who died in infancy. They lived opposite the High House in the house owned by the O’Neills. All three are buried in Corracrin. Mrs. Callan NT see above Nurse McGreevy. Mother of Raymond and Fr. Gerard. her husband died young. She was a Midwife and assisted at the birth of many inhabitants of the village and surrounding area. Nurse Geddis ?
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