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Health Care Shambles. Let me begin by stating clearly that I am in no way criticising the Nurses, Attendants and GPs for the shambles nor am I pointing the finger at local health managers, who have to work within the system and obey orders from above. So where is my blame coming to rest? For as long as I have been involved in Health Matters as Chairman of the national group HSAG (Health Services Action Group) and of the local Community Alliance, we have been forecasting the downhill slide of our health services, leading to a service, which does not meet the needs of the people of Ireland and the people responsible are our politicians. We put them there, we pay them an excellent salary and they are unable to provide us with a safe and workable health service. The ruling Government of the day seems to be guided by vested interests and, even though we have a major vested interest, our needs do not seem to matter. So we find ourselves in a total mess with various services, emergency services in particular, not capable of dealing with the requirements. Indeed many members of the HSAG and Community Alliance were persuaded to leave the organisation by the promises being made by the successive Ministers for Health, promises which never materialised. We then watched the various Health Boards being scrapped and the HSE formed to cover the entire country. This, we were informed, would streamline the decision making and we would have a better service. It failed and failed miserably even though we were paying massive wages. We then had a huge Department of Health with a huge wage bill and a huge HSE with another huge wage bill and a health system getting worse and worse. Now we are about to set up the Health Boards again and we will spend millions getting premises and staff for each of these and spend the money, which should be going to increase the medical manpower and the number of Beds and the rebuilding of services in Hospitals like Monaghan. Nurses and doctors being trained in Ireland are not staying to work in Ireland and extra beds cannot be put into hospitals unless there are nurses and doctors to look after the patients in those beds. So why are they not staying here? The conditions of work are far from attractive in comparison to other countries. Spend money on getting that right. Conditions for ambulance staff is not attractive and so it is impossible to put extra ambulances on the road. Spend money on getting that right. We have always claimed that it is most important to get a patient to hospital as quickly as possible. For an ambulance to take 1 hour to get to a call-out in Emyvale is not giving the patient a fair chance of survival and it has been shown in studies that delays in getting to hospital can be fatal or indeed more difficult to treat due to the delay. It also seems that ambulance personnel begin treatment and remain with the patient at home and advise that it is better not to go to hospital as the patient will not get a bed for up to 48 hours and maybe they will not have a trolley but a chair while they wait. We have always claimed that ‘delays costs lives’ and that the move to ‘Centralisation’ would cause deaths due to delays. Now Minister Donnelly has given Peadar Toibín facts and figures about delays and the outcomes for patients, which proves our claim. Delays in getting to the hospital, delays in getting medical attention on arrival, delays in getting a bed in a ward, delays in getting a diagnosis, and delays in getting treatment means death for many patients. Due to the overcrowding in A & E’s and wards, and the scarcity of nurses and doctors, mistakes are made from which many die or it makes their recovery much more difficult and prolonged. In 2021 the figure for mistakes and errors in hospitals totalled over 105,000, which now shows an increasing number every year. €282 million was paid out last year in compensation and 1.6Billion since 2012. In our hospital group, the RCSI Group, there were 19,259 last year, the second highest in the country. This does not include Community care and indeed there were many more in hospitals that went unreported. Surely it is past time for our politicians to set things right and provide us with a proper service. As we stated when fighting for services to be retained in Monaghan General Hospital – ‘it will only be when you need a hospital urgently that you will really know why Monaghan General Hospital should have its services returned’. Now is the time to put the pressure on our representatives, as later will be too late.
All Content Copyright emyvale.net
Health Care Shambles. Let me begin by stating clearly that I am in no way criticising the Nurses, Attendants and GPs for the shambles nor am I pointing the finger at local health managers, who have to work within the system and obey orders from above. So where is my blame coming to rest? For as long as I have been involved in Health Matters as Chairman of the national group HSAG (Health Services Action Group) and of the local Community Alliance, we have been forecasting the downhill slide of our health services, leading to a service, which does not meet the needs of the people of Ireland and the people responsible are our politicians. We put them there, we pay them an excellent salary and they are unable to provide us with a safe and workable health service. The ruling Government of the day seems to be guided by vested interests and, even though we have a major vested interest, our needs do not seem to matter. So we find ourselves in a total mess with various services, emergency services in particular, not capable of dealing with the requirements. Indeed many members of the HSAG and Community Alliance were persuaded to leave the organisation by the promises being made by the successive Ministers for Health, promises which never materialised. We then watched the various Health Boards being scrapped and the HSE formed to cover the entire country. This, we were informed, would streamline the decision making and we would have a better service. It failed and failed miserably even though we were paying massive wages. We then had a huge Department of Health with a huge wage bill and a huge HSE with another huge wage bill and a health system getting worse and worse. Now we are about to set up the Health Boards again and we will spend millions getting premises and staff for each of these and spend the money, which should be going to increase the medical manpower and the number of Beds and the rebuilding of services in Hospitals like Monaghan. Nurses and doctors being trained in Ireland are not staying to work in Ireland and extra beds cannot be put into hospitals unless there are nurses and doctors to look after the patients in those beds. So why are they not staying here? The conditions of work are far from attractive in comparison to other countries. Spend money on getting that right. Conditions for ambulance staff is not attractive and so it is impossible to put extra ambulances on the road. Spend money on getting that right. We have always claimed that it is most important to get a patient to hospital as quickly as possible. For an ambulance to take 1 hour to get to a call-out in Emyvale is not giving the patient a fair chance of survival and it has been shown in studies that delays in getting to hospital can be fatal or indeed more difficult to treat due to the delay. It also seems that ambulance personnel begin treatment and remain with the patient at home and advise that it is better not to go to hospital as the patient will not get a bed for up to 48 hours and maybe they will not have a trolley but a chair while they wait. We have always claimed that ‘delays costs lives’ and that the move to ‘Centralisation’ would cause deaths due to delays. Now Minister Donnelly has given Peadar Toibín facts and figures about delays and the outcomes for patients, which proves our claim. Delays in getting to the hospital, delays in getting medical attention on arrival, delays in getting a bed in a ward, delays in getting a diagnosis, and delays in getting treatment means death for many patients. Due to the overcrowding in A & E’s and wards, and the scarcity of nurses and doctors, mistakes are made from which many die or it makes their recovery much more difficult and prolonged. In 2021 the figure for mistakes and errors in hospitals totalled over 105,000, which now shows an increasing number every year. €282 million was paid out last year in compensation and 1.6Billion since 2012. In our hospital group, the RCSI Group, there were 19,259 last year, the second highest in the country. This does not include Community care and indeed there were many more in hospitals that went unreported. Surely it is past time for our politicians to set things right and provide us with a proper service. As we stated when fighting for services to be retained in Monaghan General Hospital – ‘it will only be when you need a hospital urgently that you will really know why Monaghan General Hospital should have its services returned’. Now is the time to put the pressure on our representatives, as later will be too late.